Component Analysis of Stay, Play, Talk Interventions With and Without Self-Monitored Group Contingencies and Recorded Reminders

Multitreatment designs were used to evaluate the relative effectiveness of multicomponent Stay, Play, Talk (SPT) interventions on peer social behaviors for two groups of children, each including one Participant With Autism Spectrum Disorder (PWA) and two socially competent peers. Children were trained to use buddy strategies during 5-min free-play sessions in an inclusive preschool classroom. Additional components were systematically introduced, including a self-monitored group contingency and recorded reminders. Dependent variables were the percentage of intervals peers spent staying near and playing with the PWA, as well as the number of verbal social interactions between the peers and the PWA. Functional relations were identified for some behaviors for some participants, with the SPT variation including recorded reminders and the group contingency associated with the most positive outcomes. Further research is needed to determine effects of the group contingency and recorded reminders without peer training. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2019.

Multitreatment designs were used to evaluate the relative effectiveness of multicomponent Stay, Play, Talk (SPT) interventions on peer social behaviors for two groups of children, each including one Participant With Autism Spectrum Disorder (PWA) and two socially competent peers. Children were trained to use buddy strategies during 5-min free-play sessions in an inclusive preschool classroom. Additional components were systematically introduced, including a self-monitored group contingency and recorded reminders. Dependent variables were the percentage of intervals peers spent staying near and playing with the PWA, as well as the number of verbal social interactions between the peers and the PWA. Functional relations were identified for some behaviors for some participants, with the SPT variation including recorded reminders and the group contingency associated with the most positive outcomes. Further research is needed to determine effects of the group contingency and recorded reminders without peer training. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2019.

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