Feasibility of a Modified Ride-on Car Intervention on Play Behaviors during an Inclusive Playgroup

Aims: Children with mobility related disabilities often experience limited participation and access to social interactions. An emerging pediatric powered mobility device are modified ride-on cars that provide self-directed mobility experiences to children with disabilities. This study aimed to determine: (1) the feasibility of a modified ride-on car intervention during an inclusive playgroup, (2) the effect of a modified ride-on car intervention on the play behaviors of children with and without mobility related disabilities. Method: A single-subject research design was implemented. Thirteen children participated in a weekly inclusive playgroup. The five children with mobility related disabilities were provided modified ride-on cars during the intervention. Children’s play behaviors were classified with Howes’ Peer Play Scale. Intervention effects were examined using nonoverlap of all pairs (NAP). Results: The intervention was feasible based on participants’ good attendance, retention rates, and successful use of modified ride-on cars. Overall children did not experience significant changes in play behaviors, with a few exceptions for decreased solitary, and increased parallel play, and/or direct peer interaction, among children with mobility related disabilities. Future research could examine modified ride-on car use by children with mobility related disabilities focusing on changes in unique play interactions between children with and without disabilities. © 2017, © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Aims: Children with mobility related disabilities often experience limited participation and access to social interactions. An emerging pediatric powered mobility device are modified ride-on cars that provide self-directed mobility experiences to children with disabilities. This study aimed to determine: (1) the feasibility of a modified ride-on car intervention during an inclusive playgroup, (2) the effect of a modified ride-on car intervention on the play behaviors of children with and without mobility related disabilities. Method: A single-subject research design was implemented. Thirteen children participated in a weekly inclusive playgroup. The five children with mobility related disabilities were provided modified ride-on cars during the intervention. Children’s play behaviors were classified with Howes’ Peer Play Scale. Intervention effects were examined using nonoverlap of all pairs (NAP). Results: The intervention was feasible based on participants’ good attendance, retention rates, and successful use of modified ride-on cars. Overall children did not experience significant changes in play behaviors, with a few exceptions for decreased solitary, and increased parallel play, and/or direct peer interaction, among children with mobility related disabilities. Future research could examine modified ride-on car use by children with mobility related disabilities focusing on changes in unique play interactions between children with and without disabilities. © 2017, © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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