Fetal and neonatal exposure to trimethylolpropane phosphate alters rat social behavior and emotional responsivity

The proconvulsant compound trimethylolpropane phosphate (TMPP) was evaluated for its effects on motor, social, and emotional behaviors. Long Evans rats were treated prenatally for 13 days and/or neonatally for 10 days. Behavioral tests were performed during treatment and several days after treatment. Beginning on gestation day 9, and continuing for 13 days, 20 dams received once daily i.p. injections. Half were treated with distilled water, the other 10 received 0.2 mg TMPP/kg body weight. No external malformations were observed in the live-born offspring of TMPP- or vehicle-exposed dams. On postnatal day 3 one-half the pups were cross-fostered to dams that had the opposite treatment as their biological mothers. Also on postnatal day 3, pups were divided into two groups, one receiving injections of distilled water, the other receiving injections of 0.2 mg TMPP/kg body weight. Ten daily injections were administered i.p., beginning postnatal day 3. Motor behaviors were evaluated in step-down and paw lift tasks and no group differences were found. At 18 days of age, one half the pups were separated from the dam and their littermates. The other half of the pups continued to be housed with the dam and remaining littermates until postnatal day 50. Social interaction was measured in juvenile play and adult social investigation. Emotional responsivity was assessed in open field activity, elevated plus-maze exploration, and ultrasonic distress vocalizations. Complex interactions were found for measures of social interaction and emotional responsivity related to drug treatment, housing condition, and sex. Due to the observed sex differences, it is hypothesized that the action of TMPP may involve a change in the hormonal systems that control the differentiation of related sex-typical behaviors. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

The proconvulsant compound trimethylolpropane phosphate (TMPP) was evaluated for its effects on motor, social, and emotional behaviors. Long Evans rats were treated prenatally for 13 days and/or neonatally for 10 days. Behavioral tests were performed during treatment and several days after treatment. Beginning on gestation day 9, and continuing for 13 days, 20 dams received once daily i.p. injections. Half were treated with distilled water, the other 10 received 0.2 mg TMPP/kg body weight. No external malformations were observed in the live-born offspring of TMPP- or vehicle-exposed dams. On postnatal day 3 one-half the pups were cross-fostered to dams that had the opposite treatment as their biological mothers. Also on postnatal day 3, pups were divided into two groups, one receiving injections of distilled water, the other receiving injections of 0.2 mg TMPP/kg body weight. Ten daily injections were administered i.p., beginning postnatal day 3. Motor behaviors were evaluated in step-down and paw lift tasks and no group differences were found. At 18 days of age, one half the pups were separated from the dam and their littermates. The other half of the pups continued to be housed with the dam and remaining littermates until postnatal day 50. Social interaction was measured in juvenile play and adult social investigation. Emotional responsivity was assessed in open field activity, elevated plus-maze exploration, and ultrasonic distress vocalizations. Complex interactions were found for measures of social interaction and emotional responsivity related to drug treatment, housing condition, and sex. Due to the observed sex differences, it is hypothesized that the action of TMPP may involve a change in the hormonal systems that control the differentiation of related sex-typical behaviors. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

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