Improvements in Physical Activity Opportunities: Results From a Community-Based Family Child Care Intervention

Introduction: Reaching preschool-aged children to establish healthy lifestyle habits, including physical activity, is an important component of obesity prevention efforts. However, few studies have examined family child care homes where nearly 1 million children receive care. Study design: A pre- and post-intervention evaluation without a control group was conducted to evaluate what changes occurred in family child care homes that participated in the Healthy Eating and Active Living project, a multicomponent obesity prevention initiative, focused on community-driven policy and environmental change in neighborhoods within Kaiser Permanente service areas. Setting/participants: From 2012 to 2014, a total of 17 family child care homes in Northern California participated in the intervention. Intervention: A physical activity workshop for child care staff and technical assistance to develop a policy to promote physical activity and other healthy behaviors. Main outcome measures: Pre and post observations, questionnaires, and physical activity logs were completed to assess change in physical activity resources available in the family child care homes, the amount of child screen time offered, type and amount of physical activity offered to children, and implementation of physical activity best practices. Results: Between baseline and follow-up, providers significantly increased both the number of structured, adult-led activities (2.6 vs 3.2 activities per day) and the number of structured, adult-led minutes of activity in which children participated (49 vs 83 minutes per day). Providers also improved screen time practices and made improvements to the physical activity environment. Conclusions: In this study, a community-based organization designed and implemented multicomponent strategies tailored for participating family child care homes. The successful implementation of the intervention likely contributed to implementation of practices that increased opportunities for physical activity for the young children attending these family child care homes. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled Building Thriving Communities Through Comprehensive Community Health Initiatives, which is sponsored by Kaiser Permanente, Community Health. © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Introduction: Reaching preschool-aged children to establish healthy lifestyle habits, including physical activity, is an important component of obesity prevention efforts. However, few studies have examined family child care homes where nearly 1 million children receive care. Study design: A pre- and post-intervention evaluation without a control group was conducted to evaluate what changes occurred in family child care homes that participated in the Healthy Eating and Active Living project, a multicomponent obesity prevention initiative, focused on community-driven policy and environmental change in neighborhoods within Kaiser Permanente service areas. Setting/participants: From 2012 to 2014, a total of 17 family child care homes in Northern California participated in the intervention. Intervention: A physical activity workshop for child care staff and technical assistance to develop a policy to promote physical activity and other healthy behaviors. Main outcome measures: Pre and post observations, questionnaires, and physical activity logs were completed to assess change in physical activity resources available in the family child care homes, the amount of child screen time offered, type and amount of physical activity offered to children, and implementation of physical activity best practices. Results: Between baseline and follow-up, providers significantly increased both the number of structured, adult-led activities (2.6 vs 3.2 activities per day) and the number of structured, adult-led minutes of activity in which children participated (49 vs 83 minutes per day). Providers also improved screen time practices and made improvements to the physical activity environment. Conclusions: In this study, a community-based organization designed and implemented multicomponent strategies tailored for participating family child care homes. The successful implementation of the intervention likely contributed to implementation of practices that increased opportunities for physical activity for the young children attending these family child care homes. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled Building Thriving Communities Through Comprehensive Community Health Initiatives, which is sponsored by Kaiser Permanente, Community Health. © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

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