Short- and long-term effects of asphyxia on juvenile play

The possibility that asphyxia may influence social processes was evaluated in two experiments. In the first, juvenile rats were asphyxiated and their play behavior (as measured by pins and dorsal contacts) was measured immediately and 30 min following recovery. Although the asphyxiated rats’ play was substantially reduced immediately following recovery, they exhibited no play changes 30 min later. The immediate play deficit was not modified by opioid blockade with 1 mg/kg of naloxone. In the second experiment, repeated asphyxiation during the neonatal period was found to have no effects on the subsequent development of juvenile play. These experiments provide no evidence for a role of asphyxia and opioids in the control of social development of mammals. © 1987, The Psychonomic Soceity, Inc.. All rights reserved.

The possibility that asphyxia may influence social processes was evaluated in two experiments. In the first, juvenile rats were asphyxiated and their play behavior (as measured by pins and dorsal contacts) was measured immediately and 30 min following recovery. Although the asphyxiated rats’ play was substantially reduced immediately following recovery, they exhibited no play changes 30 min later. The immediate play deficit was not modified by opioid blockade with 1 mg/kg of naloxone. In the second experiment, repeated asphyxiation during the neonatal period was found to have no effects on the subsequent development of juvenile play. These experiments provide no evidence for a role of asphyxia and opioids in the control of social development of mammals. © 1987, The Psychonomic Soceity, Inc.. All rights reserved.

Search